ezRecipe
  ezRecipe-FREE             v1.20
Brewhouse settings specific to the brewing system used for a recipe.

Includes mash temperature, efficiency, kettle trub, wort loss and boil evaporation.
   Brewhouse Settings
Kettle Volumes Mash Settings Thickness
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The volume of wort in the kettle at the start of the boil.
Pre Boil
The volume of wort remaining in the kettle after the boil.
Post Boil
The amount of RO or distilled water added to the mash. Water property calculations are based on the volume of strike water.

The volume of strike water combined with the weight of grains used in the mash determines mash thickness.
Strike
Mash efficiency is the percentage of potential sugars extracted from grains in the mash. Efficiencies in the 75-85% range are generally acceptable for home brewing.
Efficiency
Mash temperatures between 146F to 158F are common in homebrewing.

146F to 149F for thin body beer
150F to 153F for medium body beer
154F to 158F for full body beer.
Temp. (F)
The ratio of water to grain in the mash. As a general rule thinner mashes produce higher quality and more fermentable wort than thicker mashes.

A coorelation exists between mash pH, thickness and temperature in the mash that affects fermentability.
qt/lb
     
                 
Beer Judge Certification Program beer style guidelines. Pick a recipe style to load the recommended range of brewing values for a recipe.
    BJCP Style
The BJCP recommended range of Alcohol By Volume (ABV) used to indicate the percentage of alcohol in the style of beer.
ABV %
The BJCP recommended range of International Bittering Units (IBU) that are needed to obtain a balance between hopped bitterness and malt sweetness in a hopped beer style.
IBU
The BJCP recommended Standard Reference Method (SRM) is the color system brewers use to specify finished beer and malt color.
SRM
The BJCP recommended range for Original Gravity (OG) used to predict the potential alcohol percentage for the style of beer.
OG
The BJCP recommended range for Final Gravity (FG) used to determine the amount of unfermentable sugars and the percentage of alcohol for the style of beer.
FG
 
Min.
      Max.
                 
  Recipe Name
ABV% stands for the percentage of alcohol by volume in beer. A simple formula to predict ABV% is (OG - FG) * 131.25.

Where ABV% equals the original gravity minus the final gravity of the beer times 131.25.
ABV %
The IBU value as determined by wort volume, gravity of the wort during the boil and boil time. The Tinseth formula is used for IBU calculations.

Where AAU equals weight * Alpha Acid Units and IBU equals AAU * Utlization*74.89 / Wort Volume.
IBU
SRM is predicted by calculating the malt color units of each recipe.

Where MCU equals (pounds of grain) * (grain Lovibond color) / (post boil volume of wort).
SRM
The Original Gravity (OG) of wort is used to predict the potential alcohol percentage of a beer recipe. The OG is a measurement of sugars available in wort prior to fermentation.
OG
The Final Gravity (FG) of wort is used to predict the potential alcohol percentage of a beer recipe. The FG is a measurement of unfermentable sugars remaining in wort after fermentation has completed.
FG
The Average Specific Gravity (Avg SG) of wort is used to predict hop isomerization efficiency of alpha acids in the kettle. Hop isomerization efficiency decreases as wort gravity increases.
Avg SG
Date    
The Alcohol By Weight (ABW) used to indicate the amount of alcohol by weight of the beer recipe.
ABW %
The Bittering Unit to Gravity Unit (BU:GU) ratio is the balance of hop bitterness to malt sweetness of the recipe.
BU:GU
The number of calories in this recipe per 12 ounces of beer.
12 oz.
Calories
The number of calories in this recipe per 1 ounce of beer.
1 oz.
The number of carbohydrates in this recipe per 12 ounces of beer.
Carbs
 
         
The grains used in this recipe that are added to the mash.
  Mashed Grains
The weight of grains (Pounds) in pounds that are added to the recipe.
Pounds
The Extract Potential (Potential) is the predicted amount of fermentable sugar contributed to the recipe by the grain.

The specific gravity measurement of a mash consisting of 1 pound of grain and 1 gallon of water.
Potential
The SRM Color of the grain or adjunct added to the recipe. Used to predict the color of malt and beer.
Color
The type (Type) of grain, either Grain or Adjunct, to be added to the mash.
Type
The Percentage (Grist %) of the total grain bill for each grain in the recipe.
Grist %
The Maximum Percentage (Max. %) of the total grain bill recommended for each grain in the recipe.
Max. %
The total weight of all grains added to the mash for this recipe.
Grain Total  
The total extract potential (Mash Gravity) of all grains added to the mash for this recipe.
 <-- Mash Gravity
   
The adjuncts used in this recipe that are added to the boil kettle.
  Kettle Adjunct
Pounds Potential Color Type Sugars % Max. %
The total weight of all adjuncts added to the boil kettle for this recipe.
Adjunct Total  
The total extract potential (Adjunct Gravity) of all adjuncts added to the boil kettle for this recipe.
 <-- Adjunct Gravity
   
The mineral and acid additions that have been saved from previous recipes.
  Water Profile
Calcium Sulphate (Gypsum CaSO4) in grams, lowers mash pH by increasing acidity. Used to increase alkalinity, permanent hardness and sulfate crispness to accentuate hop bitterness.
Gypsum
Calcium Chloride (CaCl2) in grams, lowers mash pH by increasing acidity. Used to increase alkalinity, permanent hardness and add a fullness or softness.
Calc. Chlor.
Epsom Salt (MgSO4) in grams, lowers mash pH by increasing acidity. Used to increase alkalinity, permanent hardness and an additional crispness.
Epsom Salt
Lactic Acid entered as ml it used to reduce alkalinity and hardness in brewing water. The flavor threshhold of 88% Lactic Acid is near 5 ml per gallon.

A 88% solution is typically found in homebrew shops. When using a different strength acid, replace the 88% with the correct value.
Lactic Acid
The predicted mash pH (Predicted pH) of this recipe. Based on the grains used in the mash and brewing water profile.

pH 5.2 to 5.3 -> Crisper Beer
pH 5.3 to 5.4 -> Lighter Beer
pH 5.4 to 5.5 -> Darker Beer
Predicted
pH @ 77°F
Baking Soda (NaHCO3) in grams, used to raise mash pH and increase residual alkalinity. It also adds sodium which enhances sweetness in darker beers.
Baking Soda
CaSO4 CaCl2 MgSO4 NaHCO3
     
Saved Water Profile 5.2 -5.6
                 
   
The recommended magnesium ion range is 0 to 30 parts per million. Levels higher than 50 ppm introduce off flavor and diuretic effects.
Magnesium
The recommended Calcium range is 50 to 150 part per million. Enhances yeast, enzymem and protein activity. In the boil and mash contributes to beer flavor, color, clarity and stability.
Calcium
Sodium
The recommended range for Chloride is 50 to 250 parts per million. Used to enhance flavor, sweetness and beer clarity.
Chloride
The recommended range for Sulfate is 50 to 350 parts per million.
Sulfate
Chloride to Sulfate to
    Mg+2   Ca+2   Na+   Cl-   SO4-2   Sulfate Chloride
  ppm 
    0 - 30 50 - 150 0 - 150 50 - 250 50 - 300
                 
   
Carbonate is the predominate ion in water at pH 8.5 and higher. Carbonate is not soluable in water at room temperature.
Carbonate (ppm as CaCO3)
Mash Water
Carbonate is the predominate ion in water at pH 8.4 and lower. The recommended range is 0 to 250 parts per million.

0 to 50 ppm for pale beer

50 to 150 ppm for medium dark beer

150 to 250 ppm for dark beer
Bicarbonate  (ppm as HCO3-)
   
The Alkalinity in parts per million is the ability of water to resist pH changes in the mash.
Alkalinity
The Hardness in parts per million indicates the total hardness, based on the amount of bicarbonate, calcium and magnesium ions in the water.

Total hardness is used to determine the level of water softness or hardness.
Hardness
The Hardness Indicator displays the level softness or hardness based on the total hardness of the water.
Hardness Indicator
The Total in parts per million is the indicator of bicarbonate alkalinity and total hardness.
Total
The Acid Adjusted is the parts per million of bicarbonate nuetralized by acid malt or lactic acid.
Acid Adj.
Final
   
                 
The list of available hops that can be added to a recipe.

Use the Hops page to edit alpha acid percetages and hop storage index (HIS)
  Hop Addition
The weight of hops in ounces.
Ounces
The percentage of alpha acid in the selected hop.
AA%
The amount of time in minutes for the hop selected.
Time
The type of hop, either pellet of whole for the hop selected.
Hop
The type of use for the hop selected, either in the Boil, as a Dry Hop or in a Whirlpool.
Usage
The amount of international bittering units (IBU) contributed by the hop and how it is used.
IBU
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Notes
 
Profiles
             
#
The name or title of a water profile. Used to match a water profile with a beer style or recipe.
The amount of Gypsum in grams.
Gypsum
The amount of Calcium Chloride in grams.
Calcium
Chloride
The amount of Epsom Salt in grams.
Epsom
Salt
The amount of Lactic Acid in milliliters.
Lactic
Acid
The amount of Baking Soda in grams.
Bakng
Soda
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2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Hops
                 
The name of the hop variety.
The country of origin for each hop variety.
Origin
Alpha Acid Percentage
0.00%
The recommended hop usage for the variety of the hop type.
Usage
Hop Storage Index (HSI) is the percentage of alpha acid loss over a 6 month period. Hop varieties lose alpha acid at different rates, depending on storage temperature and exposure of oxygen.

1.00 Poor - has O2 or unsealed

0.75 Average - has O2 when sealed

0.50 Best - no O2 or vacuum sealed
HIS
The number of days that have passed between the time of hop packaging and their use.
Preserving alpha acid during storage depends on temperature, type of storage and the HSI of the hop variety.
Days
The recommended hop storage temperature range is 68 degrees to 10 degrees Fahrenheit

Hops stored at lower temperatures retain a greater percentage of their original alpha acid than hops stored at warmer temperatures.
°F
The percentage of hop alpha acid retained by time the hops are used. This is determined by the number of days in stored, storage temperature and amount of oxygen the hops are exposed to throughout storage.

Hops stored when frozen, in a package free of oxygen, will retain a higher percentage of alpha acid than those left unsealed at room temperature.
The method used to store hops affects the percentage of alpha acid lost due to oxidation.

Storage:
1.00 Poor - In Poly, has O2, or unsealed

0.75 Average - In sealed barrier package and exposed to O2

0.50 Best - In vacuum sealed package with no O2
Sfactor
UK Bittering
US Aroma
US Aroma
US Aroma
US Bittering
UK Aroma
UK Bittering
UK Bittering
US Both
US Bittering
UK Aroma
US Bittering
US Both
US Bittering
UK Bittering
US Bittering
US Bittering
US Aroma
US Bittering
UK Both
UK Aroma
Australia Both
US Bittering
US Aroma
Canada Aroma
UK Aroma
New Zealand Bittering
Germany Aroma
Germany Aroma
Germany Aroma
New Zealand Both
Germany Bittering
US Bittering
US Both
US Aroma
US Aroma
Germany Bittering
US Aroma
US Aroma
UK Both
New Zealand Both
Germany Both
US Bittering
Germany Both
New Zealand Bittering
Germany Bittering
UK Bittering
UK Bittering
UK Both
Australia Bittering
UK Aroma
Czech Rep Aroma
US Aroma
Germany Aroma
US Both
Germany Aroma
US Both
New Zealand Both
France Aroma
Slovenia Aroma
US Bittering
New Zealand Bittering
UK Bittering
Germany Aroma
US Aroma
Germany Bittering
US Aroma
US Aroma
US Both
UK Aroma
US Aroma
US Both
US Bittering
Grains
               
   
The SRM color of the grain.
 
The water profile classification of the grain. The types are Acid Malt, Base Malt, Crystal Malt, Other, Roast Malt, Sugar and Wheat.
Germany Grain Yes
United Kingdom Grain Yes
Belgium Grain Yes
US Adjunct No
US Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
Belgium Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
United Kingdom Grain Yes
Germany Grain Yes
US Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
US Grain No
Belgium Grain No
US Grain No
Belgium Grain No
US Grain No
United Kingdom Grain No
US Grain Yes
US Adjunct No
Canada Grain Yes
Germany Grain Yes
United Kingdom Grain Yes
Germany Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
Belgium Grain Yes
United Kingdom Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
United Kingdom Grain Yes
Belgium Grain Yes
Germany Grain Yes
United Kingdom Grain Yes
US Adjunct No
US Grain Yes
US Grain No
US Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
Germany Grain Yes
Belgium Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
US Sugar No
United Kingdom Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
Germany Grain Yes
Belgium Grain Yes
Germany Grain Yes
Germany Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
Germany Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
US Grain Yes
 
     
US Dry Extract No
US Extract No
US Sugar No
US Sugar No
US Sugar No
Belgium Sugar No
Belgium Sugar No
Belgium Sugar No
US Sugar No
US Sugar No
US Dry Extract No
US Extract No
United Kingdom Sugar No
US Dry Extract No
US Dry Extract No
US Sugar No
US Sugar No
US Sugar No
US Extract No
US Extract No
US Extract No
UK Sugar No
US Dry Extract No
US Extract No